Season of the Witch

From Saint Michaels Ministry: As statistical studies continue to indicate that Millennials are leaving Christianity, it would seem that they are not embracing atheism, but rather turning to a potentially dangerous spiritual path. 


Season of the Witch

By Michelle Goldberg, NYT Op-Ed Columinist | NOV. 3, 2017
Excerpted from the New York Times


On a Wednesday evening last week, I sat in on a class called “Witchcraft 101: Curses, Hexes and Jinxes,” at Catland, a fashionable occult boutique in Bushwick, Brooklyn. More than a dozen people, most of them young women, sat in folding chairs in the store’s black-walled event space. The instructor was one of Catland’s co-owners, Dakota Bracciale, a charismatic, foul-mouthed 28-year-old former M.A.C. makeup artist dressed in flowing black, with a beard and long, lavender nails.

“If you’re not ready to admit that the universe is chaos, I’m not sure how far you’re going to go,” Bracciale said to the class, describing witchcraft as a way to exercise power in a world without transcendent moral rules, a supernatural technology for taking care of yourself when no one else will. Witchcraft, Bracciale said, lets you be the “arbiter of your own justice.”

Related see: Christians Should Avoid Witchcraft, Occult Practices

I suspect that this assumption of chaos — the sense that institutions have failed and no one is in charge — helps explain the well-documented resurgence of occultism among millennials. Attempts at spell-casting are obviously not unique to today’s young people; the Washington writer and hostess Sally Quinn just published a book in which she boasts about hexing the renowned magazine editor Clay Felker, my former journalism professor, before his death from cancer. Still, magic and witchcraft have a renewed cachet, one that seems related to our current climate of political and cultural breakdown.
Related see:Steven Bancarz Exposes Connection Between Psychedelic Drugs and Witchcraft

There was a vibrant spiritualist movement in pre-Civil War America, and during the war the first lady, Mary Todd Lincoln, is said to have held séances in the White House. Occultism flourished in pre-revolutionary Russia and Weimar Germany as well as in the churning, distraught America of the 1970s. Often when traditional institutions and beliefs collapse and people are caught between cultural despair and cosmic hopes, they turn to magic. As Bracciale told me, “If the powers that be and established structures are leaving you by the wayside, and there is this thing which essentially offers a back door in, or a way to manipulate circumstances, why wouldn’t you try it?”

Continue reading at the New York Times

 

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